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The Curator Is In Q & A

Posted on by sbernhardt

MIA curators answering Facebook questions

On February 3, 2011, MIA Facebook fans asked our curators questions and here’s a recap of the conversation:

Natalie Northrup: what is hanging on your walls at home?

Jennifer Olivarez: Some watercolors by the late architect Ralph Rapson…he did them for his own enjoyment!

Corine Wegener: Prints from the MIA Print & Drawing Fair!

Jennifer Olivarez: I have also bought several prints from the MIA’s Print and Drawing Fair!

Joe Horse Capture:  Some contemp Native American art, a Gustavo Lira piece, some weavings my wife made, and a Robe Walker piece.

Thomas Rassieur: Prints, drawings, photos, and paintings by American 20th and 21st century artists–several of whom are friends of mine. Andrew Haines, Paul Crenshaw, Mark Trowbridge, Jeff Rosenheim, Linda Etcoff.

Bruce Rankila: What is the oldest object in the MIA collection?

Corine Wegener: Probably our ancient Sumerian peg figure from 2500 BCE. See it at http://www.artsconnected.org/resource/9379/4/peg-figure Another favorite that’s not currenlty on view.

Matthew Welch: Our oldest object is on view in gallery 236. It’s a Venus figure carved in sandstone from France’s Paleolithic era (roughly 20,000 BCE). Wow, that’s even older than me!

Paige Dansinger: What innovative risks are you willing to try when designing an exhibit? How would you like to use media in the galleries? ie: AR, Kinect or iPads…

Jan-Lodewijk Grootaers: We embrace “innovative risks”! And we’ll use some of these technologies in the new African galleries — supposed to open in September of 2012…

Thomas Rassieur:  Two days ago, I would have said Jacopo de’ Barbari’s View of View–an amazing bird’s-eye view made in the year 1500–but it just went on view for the first time in the Titian show. It is one of the great achievements of the Renaissance. It was the biggest print ever made at the time–nine feet wide. It shows every house in Venice. It was the first image ever to be copyrighted. Totally fascinating.

Mary Minnick-Daniels: What do you think of the Google Art Project?

Erika Holmquist-Wall: Love it – we’re encouraging all our followers to start a write-in campaign for the MIA to be included!

Thomas Rassieur: Amazing. The resolution of the individual images is astounding, and the views of the galleries are like seeing the face of old friends. I hope that the project will become much more widespread.

Paige Dansinger: What books are by your bed or on your desk at home?

Thomas Rassieur: Medici Conspiracy and The Forgotten Man

Erika Holmquist-Wall: Lots of biographies and “history mysteries”.

Sue Canterbury: Just finished “The Great Man” and “The Medici Conspiracy.” Now I’m knee deep in “Leo Castelli and his Circle” by Annie Cohan-Solal.

Christopher Atkins: You know, I’m reading a great book called “Operation Mincemeat”: an elaborate operation by English spies to dupe the German Army with plans for a massive Allied Invasion. It’s a quick read and better than 007. http://www.amazon.com/Operation-Mincemeat-Bizarre-Assured-Victory/dp/0307453278/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1296764233&sr=8-1

Paige Dansinger: Sounds fun! Do themes like this in your book find a place in the kinds of works you are inspired to exhibit at the museum? Mystery, complexity, social/political, intrigue?

Corine Wegener: Paul Revere’s Ride by David Hackett Fischer

Erika Holmquist-Wall: I think so; the exhibit ideas that I’m most interested in have a narrative.

Matthew Welch: Artscience: Creativity in the Post-Google Generation (David Edwards); Little Boy: The Arts of Japan’s Exploding Subculture (Takashi Murakami, ed.)

Natalie Northrup: What do you look forward to curating in the future? What artists or works do you hope the museum will collect for the future?

Corine Wegener: Looking forward to reinstalling the arms and armor collection this spring.

Joe Horse Capture: I am currently working/researching an exhibition about Native American courting.

Jennifer Olivarez: I’ll be putting together an exhibition of post-1945 design which is a personal favorite area of mine: http://artsmia.org/index.php?section_id=2&exh_id=4053
In June, we’ll have a beautiful wood art exhibition from a local collection that should also have wide appeal! http://artsmia.org/index.php?section_id=2&exh_id=3729

Jan-Lodewijk Grootaers: In the Fall we’ll have a show on African beads.

Sue Canterbury: I’m presently working on a Gauguin exhibition for 2014.

Thomas Rassieur: I’m working on a major Rembrandt show that will be here in the summer of 2012–Rembrandt in America. We will have some of the most exquisite paintings in America on view here at the MIA. Many are coming from distant museums and private collections. This will probably be the largest group of Rembrandt paintings brought together in America for a generation.
We will have some of the brash pictures from very early in his career as well as the profound work of his last years.
We will also compare pictures that are now considered to Rembrandt with some that used to be thought to be by him. There will even be some for which the jury is still out.

Paige Dansinger: Who were some of your most influential mentors?

Dennis Michael Jon: Mark Haxthausen, professor and curator, now at Williams College and Harvard’s Busch- Reisinger Museum…the smartest person I ever met and my graduate adviser.

Thomas Rassieur: Robert Koch, the college professor who first placed masterpieces in my hands. Ray Lewis, an art dealer who first showed me the ropes in the arcana of print literature. Egbert-haverkamp Begemann, who really turned me on to Rembrandt. My dad, who taught me in more ways than I can count.

Jennifer Olivarez: I learned a lot about decorative arts from my professor at the University of Glasgow, Juliet Kinchin, who is now working with the historic design collection at the Museum of Modern Art. Her latest project is Counter Space, about the development of the modern kitchen: http://www.moma.org/visit/calendar/exhibitions/1062

Elizabeth Fleming Jones: If you could choose one work of art in the collection to describe your personality, which one would it be?

Corine Wegener: Probably the 18th century Venetian desk, which has lots of secret drawers, doors and compartments…

Erika Holmquist-Wall: Ernst Ludwig Kirchner’s Franzi.

Thomas Rassieur: William Blake’s Nebuchadnezzar. You’ve got to see this one! http://www.artsconnected.org/resource/8398/nebuchadnezzar?style=print

Paige Dansinger: Is there a portrait painting or object in the museum that you think you look like – or identify most with?

Erika Holmquist-Wall: We’re just grateful that no one resembles the John Singleton Copley.

Paige Dansinger: If the museum was your home what Period Room would you eat & sleep in?

Sue Canterbury: The Duluth Room! BUT it doesn’t have a bed!

Eike Schmidt: I’d sleep in the chimneypiece of the Grand Salon

Erika Holmquist-Wall: The Duluth Room!

Jennifer Olivarez:  I might camp out in the Frank Lloyd Wright hallway…it has the best view! There has to be room to fit a dorm fridge somewhere! Thanks Paige!
Although I have to say the Frankfurt Kitchen might be better for that…

Corine Wegener: The Charleston Dining and Drawing Rooms of course!

Thomas Rassieur: Why bother? I already eat & sleep in my office. I don’t need a blanket; I just burrow in under the papers on my desk.

Paul Wegener: How naughty will Bella Naughty be? Is that why we’re wearing masks :)

Eike Schmidt: The real question is, how bella will she be?

Christopher Atkins: It’ll be a great party with some lovely paintings but I wouldn’t expect anything like ‘Eyes Wide Shut’!

Sue Canterbury: PW: Are you looking for license to misbehave?

Elizabeth Fleming Jones: Yikes!

Heidi Quicksilver: What art museum / collection, besides the MIA, is your favorite to visit?

Sue Canterbury: The Soanes Museum in London! What a treasure box!

Erika Holmquist-Wall: Many, many! I love the Hirschsprung in Copenhagen, and the Thielska Galleriet in Stockholm.

Corine Wegener: The Victoria and Albert Museum in London, the Louvre, the Met…who can pick just one?

Eike Schmidt: Within the range of 2 miles, the Walker!

David Little: The Menil Collection; perfect architecture, perfect collection.

Patrick Noon: The Frick in New York

Thomas Rassieur: The Kunsthistorisches Museum in Vienna;–to borrow David’s expression–perfect architecture, perfect collection.

Andrew Nordin: The “recontextualizing” of some of the objects has been great for us art professors teaching art history/art appreciation. What about artists “mining” the museum?

Christopher Atkins: AN: we’re working with some artists on a program called ‘Artist Voice/Artist Choice’ where they’ll be able to talk about their work in relation to objects in the MIA’s collection. It’ll be a great teaching tool for YOU. Have a look here for a few example sets and stay tuned for more: http://www.mnartists.org/article.do?rid=262386

Eike Schmidt: Mining is allowed as long as you don’t melt down the silver gallery, please!

Cameron Keith Gainer: If you could choose a single work from other museums, galleries, collections etc without considering cost or availability to add to the collection what would it be?
Same circumstances but for your personal collection?

Thomas Rassieur: Do you think that we could get permission to put the Great Pyamids of Giza in Fair Oaks Park?

Sue Canterbury: Hmmm….how about Botticelli’s Birth of Venus?

Thomas Rassieur: For my old master collection, I’ll take the statue of Mycerinus with the Falcon in the National Museum of Egypt. For my modern collection, I’ll take Dürer’s Alle Heiligen Altar. For my contemporary collection, Cameron, I’ll take your sea serpant. It will look great in my bathtub.

David Little: Museum: Picasso’s Les Demoiselles d’Avignon or Richter’s October 18, 1977. Home: Pollock’s Full Fathom Five

Christopher Atkins: For the MIA’s collection I’d add Bacon’s “Three Studies for Figures at the Base of a Crucifixion”. As for my personal collection I’d love to have a selection of Mapplethorpe’s self-portraits.

Willy Lee: If you could do someone else’s job in the museum, whose would you choose?

Christopher Atkins: That’s a good question…I think I’d be one of our Visual Resources photographers. They get to see all the new artwork that comes into the museum, they have these really cool cameras that take amazing photos, and they get to use Macs :)

Jennifer Olivarez: It would be interesting to be a gallery guard for a day, to really see our diverse audience’s reaction to the art, the galleries, wayfinding, and other aspects that we don’t get to experience fully. Thanks Willy!

Corine Wegener: I’d be in Public Programs so I’d get to schedule all the great rock bands who play on Third Thursdays!

Heidi Quicksilver: The cameras don’t take the photos. The people behind the cameras do. :)

Christopher Atkins: Hah true! But it still nice to have super cool cameras

Jessica Lussenhop: Which piece has the most interesting ownership history? The most interesting backstory?

Erika Holmquist-Wall: The Johannes Lingelbach. See our Provenance Project on our website for the full history of the painting, as well as other fascinating stories! http://www.artsmia.org/viewer/index.php?v=12&op=79&showall=1

Joe Horse Capture: This object: http://www.artsconnected.org/resource/3444/1/mask was collected in Alaska by D.F. Tozier about 1900, then sold to the Museum of the American Indian. In the early 40s it was deaccessioned and sold to a dealer in NYC. Max Ernst and others “discovered” Yupik art and starting buying objects from the dealer. The mask above, which is in the MIA’s collection and currently on view, was once owned by Andre Breton.

Marty Nelson: What is your favorite piece at the MIA, and/or in other museums around the world?

Corine Wegener: My favorite is the Masterpiece cup and cover by Johann Friedrich Baer. Check it out at http://www.artsmia.org/viewer/detail.php?v=12&id=109118

Sue Canterbury: Hard question! I love so many. Rembrandt’s Lucretia is definitely in my first rank. The tragedy of her choice strikes a deep chord of empathy every time I view that painting.

Jan-Lodewijk Grootaers: A tough one! It’s like with music: pieces that you favor at one time get replaced by new discoveries. That’s why you should keep coming to the MIA!

Marty Nelson: What is some advice you could give to a college student majoring in Fine arts, as far as getting their name out there after college?

Erika Holmquist-Wall: Network and intern – attend events, conferences, openings. Apprentice, if that’s what your chosen medium calls for. It really requires a bit of chutzpah and a willingness to put yourself out there.

Eike Schmidt: Presence on Facebook is certainly a good start…

Heidi Quicksilver: What is your FAVORITE object in the MIA’s collection?

Joe Horse Capture:  It changes every week. This is my latest love: http://artsconnected.org/resource/1542/9/moccasins

Thomas Rassieur: Hi Heidi! It may vary from day to day, but often it’s our big Egon Shiele drawing of the young woman with the plaid robe.

Jennifer Olivarez: Mine is the largest one, Heidi, with which you must be familiar…http://artsmia.org/unified-vision/purcell-cutts-house/introduction-1.cfm

Dennis Michael Jon: So many great objects, but Francisco Goya’s “Self-portrait with Dr. Arrieta” is one of those rare paintings that stirs the soul.

Joe Horse Capture: The curators need more questions–only one hour left. Work with me people!

Jennifer Olivarez: When are those teepees going to be defrosted? Were they out all winter on the Plains?

David Little: Joe, if you could have only three books on Native American art and culture, what would they be? I know this is a Curator Asking a Curator, but I need to know.

Joe Horse Capture: Oh boy. Native American Heritage, Seven Visions of Bull Lodge, and Art of the American Indians: The Thaw Collection.

Jennifer Olivarez: Joe, I’m waiting.

Marianne Combs: Wait, so the curators are asking other curators questions now??

Joe Horse Capture: that happens all the time . . .

Marianne Combs: Okay – here’s one: If you had a duel between Joe Horse Capture’s favorite work of Native American art and David Little’s favorite photograph (both from the MIA collection) which works of art would they be, and which one would win? (and yes I know everyone wins with art, yadda yadda yadda)

Joe Horse Capture: Ultimate Art Fighting in the Thunderdome?

Marianne Combs: You got it! That’ll bring in the patrons…

Marianne Combs: Seriously though – wouldn’t it be fun to have a popularity contest amongst the most prominent works in the collection? It would be structured like a tennis tournament or football competition…Each department could have it’s own playoffs, and then the winners from each department could face off in a museum “World Series”

David Little: It would be a bit of an unfair fight. I have a bunch of images made on light sensitive paper while other collections have weapons, armor, a barb wire cube and a passive aggressive dog.

Marianne Combs: wimp.

Marianne Combs: ?(obviously the superbowl is getting to me, even though I don’t watch football!)

Joe Horse Capture: art isn’t a competition . . .

Marianne Combs: Sigh… never mind.

Heidi Quicksilver: Ha!

Declan Christian Ring: asks have you ever come across any haunted antiquities?

Christopher Atkins: Have you seen the ‘Haunted MIA’ flickr page by our very own Lori Erickson? Spooooky! http://www.flickr.com/photos/lorika/sets/72157602747964354/comments/
Jennifer Olivarez: They’re not antiquities, but some of our period rooms have been thought to be haunted…the Connecticut room was examined by the MN Paranormal Society and got good “vibes,” but personally, I’ve been feeling it more in the Georgian Room…http://www.artsconnected.org/resource/6014/2/connecticut-room
I’d be interested to know what you think after visiting the Purcell-Cutts House too: http://artsmia.org/unified-vision/purcell-cutts-house/introduction-1.cfm

Mika McBroom: I am in the process of getting my MA in Art Museum and Gallery Studies and would like to know, after I graduate, what is the best way of getting my foot in the door of the museum world? Any advice?

Kim Golden: Glad you asked this question!

Erika Holmquist-Wall: Network, intern, informational interviews….get yourself out there!

Sue Canterbury: I would advise that you interview professionals involved in various areas of the museum to see what their specific careers involve. That might help you narrow your focus on where you really want to make your mark.

Corine Wegener: Know what you want to do and find an internship that fits!

Thomas Rassieur: That very much depends on what sort of career you seek. There are many different paths to rewarding museum careers. I wanted to be a curator; so, I set out to develop serious expertise in areas of art that appealed both to me and to many museums. Go out and learn everything you can about the area that interests you. I’m not just talking about what you learn from books and classes. They are valuable, but you also need first hand experience of works of art, or public relations, or event planning, or display construction, or education, or development, or security, or conservation, or accounting, or information technology, or whatever it is. Once you’ve made some real progress, volunteer your services to a museum and do your best to be of service to your colleagues. Good luck!
Here’s some more advice if you want to get in on the curatorial or educational side…Start writing. Book reviews are a great way to join the conversation. They help you to focus your studies and to get your ideas into print. You will build… your resume and, one hopes, become a valuable member of the art community.

Elizabeth Knudson Steiner: In light of the situation in Egypt, I have been wondering if U.S. museums have disaster plans in effect for non-natural disasters.

Corine Wegener: Disaster planning for museums includes both natural and man-made disasters. The MIA has an Emergency Planning Team and a comprehensive written emergency plan that covers many different scenarios.

Erika Holmquist-Wall: Got any more questions for our curators? The Curators Are In!

Jennifer Olivarez: Any decorative arts enthusiasts out there? Let’s hear what you want to know about the MIA’s collection!

Dawn Vukson: I’ve been blown away by the Google Art Project. Is the Minneapolis Institute of Arts planning to be included or to do something similar?

Erika Holmquist-Wall: We’ve contacted them already, and hope to be included. Fingers crossed!

Matthew Welch: We’d love to be part of the Google Art Project, Dawn. How about a write-in campaign to help make our case!

Heidi Quicksilver: Check out some of the MIA on Photosynth!!! http://photosynth.net/view.aspx?cid=eb391f0f-b583-4022-b28c-f6f352112179
Walk around the MIA just like you can on Google Art. :)

Dawn Vukson: Thanks Heidi!

Kim Golden: After what I think was the success of the iAfrica mobile app, I’m interested in knowing if there are any other technology projects you all are working towards.

Christopher Atkins: For our ‘Facing the Lens’ exhibition we have a really cool flickr page where you can upload your own photos. And they’re displayed in the gallery. Whoa, you’re part of the show (that rhymes) http://www.flickr.com/groups/facingthelens/

Jan-Lodewijk Grootaers: Yes, we are! One of the upcoming projects is to re-install the African galleries, and we will offer visitors the possibility to hear recordings of the musical instruments on display. We even consider including some interactive technology so that you may actually play these instruments!

Thomas Rassieur: To some extent, but the original works of art should remain the focus.
For a specific example, we’d like to do a show about the Jacopo De’ Barbari View of Venice. Technology might provide great ways to highlight the many types on information in the map as well as the many resonnances it has with later times. We hope to show the present appearance of specific places, works of art that were in the various buildings, the names of all the buildings, a complete tie-in with current cartography, etc.

Jennifer Olivarez: The Titian and the Golden Age of Venetian Painting exhibition is featuring a downloadable audio tour for your smart device! More here: http://www.artsmia.org/titian/

Kim Golden: Thank you for sharing!

Erin Sayer: Is the museum able to benefit from the Legacy Amendment at all? Any new programs or acquisitions coming up that you are excited about?

Erika Holmquist-Wall: Yes! It’s a benefit for most, if not all, arts organizations in the state of Minnesota.
For the second part of your question, we’ve got an amazing trifecta of exhibitions on view – Titian, Beauty and Power (Renaissance bronzes) and The Mourners. Plus a wonderful assortment of gallery rotations!

Christopher Atkins: MAEP is working on a new pilot project with Minneapolis College of Art & Design students Carla Rodriguez & Ethan Holbrooke called ‘MCAD@MIA’. You can stop by to see their site-specific sound installation on March 17. It’s going to be really cool!

Kate Elliott: What one work in the collection do you field the most questions about?

Corine Wegener: The most common question I get is, “how much does that piece of armor/helmet weigh?”

Rachel McGarry: Poussin’s “Germanicus”; I get asked about this painting whenever I travel outside of Minneapolis…by envious collectors and curators alike.

Erika Holmquist-Wall: The Lucretia. Was the knife originally a wineglass? (No!)

Dennis Michael Jon: When’s it’s on view, Anselm Kiefer’s artist’s book “Unternehmen Seelow” (Operation Sea Lion), an enigmatic exploration of Adolf Hitler’s planned invasion of England during WW II, prompts many questions and interpretations. It can be seen in the Jones Print Study Room when not on view.

Thomas Rassieur: For me it might be our gorgeous Degas color landscape. He made it in 1890 when he had become an anti-impressionist. It’s nealry abstract. It’s simultaneously a painting, a drawing, and a print. A complicated and beautiful object.

David Little: I get quite a few questions about Dorothea Lange’s picture of Florence Owens Thompson and her children, better known as the “Migrant Mother.” We have a wonderful print of the work. It is one of the most well-known and perhaps least understood pictures.

Matthew Welch: Probably the Dale Chihuly in the lobby. The guards are always asked how we keep it clean, and how we change the lights.

Craig Eliason: What is Erika Holmquist-Wall’s least favorite smell?

Erika Holmquist-Wall: Very funny, Craig. Lately, dirty diaper ranks pretty high.

Jennifer Olivarez: I would guess the long-leftover lunches in the staff fridge would be right up there.

Jenn Stromberg: Yes, Erika – do tell! :)

Laurie Barr: Why am I compelled to touch the art? I don’t, but the urge is overwhelming!

Erika Holmquist-Wall: Because you’re human! :)

Jennifer Olivarez: Well, we understand that is very tempting, especially with decorative arts objects (who doesn’t want to sit in a chair?) But we hope you respect that we’re trying to preserve these works for future generations!

Joe Horse Capture: Because we all want to be closer to beautiful things. Like @Christopher Atkins said, please don’t touch!

Eike Schmidt: That’s a good impulse. Many works of art were originally created to be touched as well as being viewed. Obviously, with the mandate to preserve the art for future generations, we can’t allow that anymore for works within the museum.

Sue Canterbury: Because you’re human. We all want to test whether the illusion (surfaces, etc.) pairs up with our own knowledge, or to grasp how that illusion was created.

Jennifer Olivarez: We also work with our security staff to make sure they are friendly but gentle reminders to stay one foot away from the art for its protection. Remember, the gallery guards are your friends!

Jessica Lussenhop: Have any of the museum’s works ever been stolen?

Erika Holmquist-Wall: Unfortunately, while works from museums (in general) are infrequently stolen, many are often recovered, simply because it’s difficult to sell them.

Thomas Rassieur:  Yes, unfortunately. In the 1970s we lent a fine group of Picasso prints to another museum, and they were stolen from the exhibition. Our Picasso holdings still suffer as a result.

Sue Canterbury: Well, not that we’re aware of! Have anything to confess?

Jenn Stromberg: What is your favorite item (or one you think is most interesting/unique etc) in the collection that is not currently (and hasn’t recently been) on display, and why?

Joe Horse Capture: For Native American art, we have a great carved pipe created by an important artists from the northern plains, No Two Horns (object info here: http://artsconnected.org/resource/8672/2/pipe-bowl, sorry no pic). He carved an image of himself on a horse that completely wraps around the object. Plus, he carved it with one hand! It has never been on display, but hopefully we will put it in the Native American art galleries this summer. Thanks for asking!

Rachel McGarry: I work in the Prints and Drawings department and since works on paper are sensitive to light, we rotate the works in our department constantly–exhibiting them for 3-6 months then “resting” them in dark storage. Thus many of my favorite works are now off view, for example, Durer’s Adam and Eve print, Vouet’s dazzling chalk study, Degas’s landscape pastel monotype. Make an appointment in the Print Study room and view any of these works.

Christopher Atkins: We recently acquired Cy Thao’s “Hmong Migration’ series, it’s a beautifully painted history of Thao’s family and Hmong ancestors. You can see a video of it on mnoriginal’s site here: http://www.mnoriginal.org/art/?p=2836

David Little: Last year we bought four great painted photographs from the 1980s by Russian artist Boris Mikhailov that I love. I should love them because I recommended them for purchase! My favorite is of two Russian soldiers with a teddy bear. It is …a found picture that the artist enlarged and painted with watercolor pigment to accentuate features. Mikhailov worked as a touch up artist for many years. You don’t often see soldiers with a teddy bear; Mikhailov’s intention was to poke fun at Russian authoritarian society. It’s not on view because there hasn’t been the right show to display the work and give it context. Watch for the work in the next year though.

Matthew Welch: There are so many favorites that are not on view because of their fragile nature. Works on paper and textiles can only go on view periodically as exposure to light is damaging. My favorites are some of our late 18th century Japanese woodblock prints (Utamaro and Kiyonaga send me into orbit!)

Liz Armstrong: One of my favorites is one of our newest acquisitions — a Bill Viola video from his Transfiguration series that is currently installed on the third floor of the museum. It has a timeless relationship with the wonderful 15th century sculptures called The Mourners that are also on view nearby.

Thomas Rassieur:  When it comes to works of art not on view, the Department of Prints and Drawings is your destination. We’ve got well over 30,000 works that are not in the galleries. That may sound bad, but it actually creates a great opportunity for you. Y…ou are welcome to come to the Herschel V. Jones Study Room for Prints and Drawings to see virtually anything you want in our collection. It’s a great experience–an opportunity for very direct encounters with great works of art. The works of art range from the 14th to the 21st centuries. We have works by Dürer, Rembrandt, Piranesi, Toulouse-Lautrec, Kollwitz, Canaletto, Kieffer, and on and on. All there for you! The Study room is open Tuesday-Friday, 10-12 and 1:30-4:30. Call 612-870-3105 to make an appointment.

Corine Wegener: The Scandanavian immigrant trunk – need to get that back on view!

Jenn Stromberg: So interesting! Thanks for your answers! :)

Kelly Boettcher: What collection is coming next?

Thomas Rassieur:  Titian and the Golden Age of Painting in Venice, along with Venice on Paper. Both are beautiful!

Carol Gray: What object would you consider the “star of the show” in a traveling exhibit of your making?

Christopher Atkins: Well, for MAEP, we just opened up new exhibitions with Peter Happel Christian & Margaret Wall-Romana. Up next, we’ll have solo shows with Liz Miller & Paula McCartney, April 21. It’ll be a lot warmer then!

Laurie Barr: CA why do ppl want to touch the art? Is this common? Is it ever possible for the average museum goer?

Christopher Atkins: LB: yes, careful don’t touch and ‘Don’t Lick the Art’!

Bill McCoy: Do we have a boffo event coming on the horizon?

Bill McCoy: I mean to say, what’s being pursued for a possible future event?

Liz Armstrong: Hi Bill, the MIA just announced that it will be doing a major projection with artists Ali Momeni and Jenny Schmid on the 3rd Avenue facade of the museum as part of the Northern Spark TC-wide all night arts festival on June 4.

Thomas Rassieur:  The Jacopo de’ Barbari View of Venice is AWESOME. Come see it in the Titian show. It shows the city just as it was when Titian arrived as a boy. It’s huge. It’s rare–we recently bought it–the first time one has changed hands in 60 years. It’s Google earth 500 years ahead of time.

Christopher Atkins: Well ‘Bella Naughty’ opening event and party is this weekend. It’ll be a lot of fun and you’ll see some beautiful Titian paintings that haven’t left the UK in 200+ years.

Christopher Ross Nygaard: Was the Sheldon Peck 1828, Early American Folk painting on wood panel removed from the on-loan collection by the new owner, or is it still in the gallery?

Erika Holmquist-Wall: We’re trying to figure out which Peck you are referring to – there have been a couple of Pecks in the folk art gallery over the years.

Josiah Overfors: If I’m a huge fan of Abraham Storck’s “Four Days’ Battle” what of his or peers’ other works would you recommend?

Erika Holmquist-Wall: Several years ago, we had a great exhibition on Dutch marine art; the Storck was included, along with many of his contemporaries. I highly recommend checking it out. The show was called “Mirror of Empire.”

Erika Holmquist-Wall: Sorry – meant to say a great CATALOGUE was produced and is still available.

Michal Daniel: Given the unrivaled, stunningly rich history of Minnesota’s photography, what would it take to put together an exhaustive exhibition focusing precisely on only that?

Mark Ryan: How are participants in MAEP shows selected?

Christopher Atkins: MR: Thanks for asking! MAEP exhibitions are selected by an elected panel of 7 artists who serve alternating 2 year terms, and represent Twin Cities and greater Minnesota artists. We meet once a month. If you’d like more info on MAEP, our exhibitions, AND how to submit a proposal check out www.artsmia.org/maep. Send me an email if you have any questions!

Thomas Rassieur: Look forward to chatting with you next time. Invite your friends to join us March 3rd at 1 PM.

Heidi Quicksilver: Can’t wait.

Paige Dansinger: Thank you curators for taking this time to connect with the community and promote such a progressive model for engaging participation.

Joe Horse Capture: It’s over–the Curators are Out. Thanks everyone!

Minneapolis Institute of Arts

Minneapolis Institute of Arts The “Curator Is In” is on! Our curators are online. Post your questions directly on our wall and our curators will respond as quickly as they can.

3 hours ago · · · Promote

  • You and 10 others like this.
    • Kelly Boettcher What collection is coming next?

      3 hours ago ·
    • Thomas Rassieur Titian and the Golden Age of Painting in Venice, along with Venice on Paper. Both are beautiful!

      3 hours ago ·
    • Carol Gray What object would you consider the “star of the show” in a traveling exhibit of your making?

      3 hours ago ·
    • Christopher Atkins Well, for MAEP, we just opened up new exhibitions with Peter Happel Christian & Margaret Wall-Romana. Up next, we’ll have solo shows with Liz Miller & Paula McCartney, April 21. It’ll be a lot warmer then!

      3 hours ago ·
    • Laurie Barr Why am I compelled to reach out and touch the works of art? I don’t, of course, but the urge is always almost overwhelming!

      3 hours ago ·
    • Christopher Ross Nygaard Was the Sheldon Peck 1828, Early American Folk painting on wood panel removed from the on-loan collection by the new owner, or is it still in the gallery?

      3 hours ago ·
    • Christopher Atkins LB: yes, careful don’t touch and ‘Don’t Lick the Art’!

      3 hours ago · · 1 personLoading…
    • Jan-Lodewijk Grootaers Yes, we are! One of the upcoming projects is to re-install the African galleries, and we will offer visitors the possibility to hear recordings of the musical instruments on display. We even consider including some interactive technology so that you may actually play these instruments!

      3 hours ago ·
    • Bill McCoy Do we have a boffo event coming on the horizon?

      3 hours ago ·
    • Erika Holmquist-Wall We’re trying to figure out which Peck you are referring to – there have been a couple of Pecks in the folk art gallery over the years.

      3 hours ago ·
    • Laurie Barr CA: why do ppl want to touch the art? Is this common? Is it ever possible for the average museum goer?

      3 hours ago ·
    • Christopher Atkins Well ‘Bella Naughty’ opening event and party is this weekend. It’ll be a lot of fun and you’ll see some beautiful Titian paintings that haven’t left the UK in 200+ years.

      3 hours ago ·
    • Bill McCoy I mean to say, what’s being pursued for a possible future event?

      3 hours ago ·
    • Josiah Overfors If I’m a huge fan of Abraham Storck’s “Four Days’ Battle” what of his or peers’ other works would you recommend?

      3 hours ago ·
    • Erika Holmquist-Wall Several years ago, we had a great exhibition on Dutch marine art; the Storck was included, along with many of his contemporaries. I highly recommend checking it out. The show was called “Mirror of Empire.”

      2 hours ago ·
    • Erika Holmquist-Wall Sorry – meant to say a great CATALOGUE was produced and is still available.

      2 hours ago ·
    • Michal Daniel Given the unrivaled, stunningly rich history of Minnesota’s photography, what would it take to put together an exhaustive exhibition focusing precisely on only that?

      2 hours ago ·
    • Liz Armstrong Hi Bill, the MIA just announced that it will be doing a major projection with artists Ali Momeni and Jenny Schmid on the 3rd Avenue facade of the museum as part of the Northern Spark TC-wide all night arts festival on June 4.

      2 hours ago ·
    • Mark Ryan How are participants in MAEP shows selected?

      2 hours ago ·
    • Christopher Atkins MR: Thanks for asking! MAEP exhibitions are selected by an elected panel of 7 artists who serve alternating 2 year terms, and represent Twin Cities and greater Minnesota artists. We meet once a month. If you’d like more info on MAEP, our exhibitions, AND how to submit a proposal check out www.artsmia.org/maep. Send me an email if you have any questions!
Eike Schmidt:

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