Common Objects/Obsessive Forms

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New and recent work by six sculptors emphasized kinetic interaction and obsessive strategies for organizing common objects and materials. The exhibition featured a cork bowling alley by Jan Elftmann, the famous “cork car lady”; a high-tech virtual cave that sensed the viewer's presence, by a robot-master Bill Klaila; a fleet of power window chairs with a “California look” by furniture whiz Joy Kops; Bucephalus, a 16-foot model of Alexander the Great's horse, interpreting the human “conquest” of the horse through history, by Alan Wadzinski; Matchbox, by Rollin Marquette, well known for his outrageous and pristine speculations on the nature of ballistics and “the uncomfortable side of creativity”; and an assortment of Rick Salafia's punning reconfigurations of ordinary objects, such as ladders and darts (“no matter what a tool is meant for, it can always be used as a hammer”). New and recent work by six sculptors emphasized kinetic interaction and obsessive strategies for organizing common objects and materials. The exhibition featured a cork bowling alley by Jan Elftmann, the famous “cork car lady”; a high-tech virtual cave that sensed the viewer's presence, by a robot-master Bill Klaila; a fleet of power window chairs with a “California look” by furniture whiz Joy Kops; Bucephalus, a 16-foot model of Alexander the Great's horse, interpreting the human “conquest” of the horse through history, by Alan Wadzinski; Matchbox, by Rollin Marquette, well known for his outrageous and pristine speculations on the nature of ballistics and “the uncomfortable side of creativity”; and an assortment of Rick Salafia's punning reconfigurations of ordinary objects, such as ladders and darts (“no matter what a tool is meant for, it can always be used as a hammer”).
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 +==Related Works of Art==
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 +==Related Materials==
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 +==Your Comments Here==
==Related Events== ==Related Events==

Revision as of 17:35, 5 January 2007

Artists: Jan Elftmann, Bill Klaila, Joy Kops, Alan Wadzinski, Rollin Marquette and Rick Salafia
December 18, 1998 - February 7, 1999
Minnesota Artists Gallery

New and recent work by six sculptors emphasized kinetic interaction and obsessive strategies for organizing common objects and materials. The exhibition featured a cork bowling alley by Jan Elftmann, the famous “cork car lady”; a high-tech virtual cave that sensed the viewer's presence, by a robot-master Bill Klaila; a fleet of power window chairs with a “California look” by furniture whiz Joy Kops; Bucephalus, a 16-foot model of Alexander the Great's horse, interpreting the human “conquest” of the horse through history, by Alan Wadzinski; Matchbox, by Rollin Marquette, well known for his outrageous and pristine speculations on the nature of ballistics and “the uncomfortable side of creativity”; and an assortment of Rick Salafia's punning reconfigurations of ordinary objects, such as ladders and darts (“no matter what a tool is meant for, it can always be used as a hammer”).

Contents

Related Works of Art

Related Materials

Your Comments Here

Related Events

  • Opening Reception: Thursday, December 17, 1998 in the Minnesota Artists Gallery.
  • Artists -led tour: January 17, 1999 in the Minnesota Artists Gallery. With Jan Elftmann, Bill Klaila, Joy Kops, Rollin Marquette, and Alan Wadzinski.

Related Exhibitions