Upcoming Exhibitions

From Minnesota Artists Exhibition Program

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Paula McCartney and Liz Miller
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-==Mayumi Amada and Eun-Kyung Suh==+==Flourish==
-Friday, July 16, 2010—Sunday, September 26, 2010+[[image:10_Davis_05.jpg|top|thumb|250px|Jennifer Davis,Preserve, 2009, acrylic/graphite/charcoal on paper]]
 +'''Jennifer Davis, Erika Olson, Terrance Payne, and Joe Sinness'''<br>
 +'''Friday, October 22, 2010—Sunday, January 2, 2011'''<br>
Minnesota Artists Exhibition Gallery Minnesota Artists Exhibition Gallery
-The fine and tenacious threads that represent generational and societal memory are the foundation for the work of these two Minnesota artists. 
-Mayumi Amada's exhibition "Kuon: Eternal Flow of Time" focuses on domestic female roles. Using lacework as a basis for an exploration of Kuon (the Japanese word for the Buddhist concept of time), she creates elaborate patterns out of single strands representing the patterns of life. Amada's delicate forms emerge from garbage bags and water bottles often inscribed with messages such as "Everybody Dies" in crisp sampler-style lettering. Her meditations on mortality, ancestry and craft ponder, often humorously, the mundane in life's daily chores and materials.+The Minnesota Artists Exhibition Program presents "Flourish," a group exhibition featuring new work by four Minneapolis artists: Jennifer Davis, Erika Olson Gross, Terrence Payne, and Joe Sinness.
-Bojagi, a traditional Korean art form, inspires Eun-Kyung Suh's work. Bojagi are cloths wrapped around objects for protection and transport. Made from small scraps of material, Bojagi are often decorated to form beautiful patch-worked wrappers. Suh uses this technique to protect memories and experiences. Her installations comprise many pieces containing small bits of information in sheer cloth. Often the packages are silk-screened with images and text, offering clues to their contents. Others, such as "Purple on Thursday," hold wishes in gauzy chiffon fortune cookies.+Davis's delicate paintings include a cast of animal, monster, and human characters who all have parts to play in her colorful fantasies. But her charming, Easter-egg palette belies the underlying psychological dramas of introversion and lost innocence.
-==Jennifer Davis, Erika Olson, Terrance Payne, and Joe Sinness==+Olson Gross is a multi-media artist whose sculptures and paintings express the poetry and fecundity of nature. Her most recent bucolic landscapes are intricately painted. The illustrative, woodblock-print flatness of her animal and flora forms resemble collaged scraps of paper attached to the canvas.
-Friday, October 22, 2010—Sunday, January 2, 2011+ 
 +[[image:10_Olson_01.jpg|left|thumb|300 px|Erika Olson Gross
 +Houses, 2010, Watercolor, gouache and graphite on paper]]
 +Payne's large oil pastels on paper produce a sense of humor tinged with melancholy; the hand-written captions reveal his characters' internal narratives of disappointment, apathy, and resignation.
 + 
 +Rendered in colored pencil with a fastidious, hyper-realistic attention to detail, Sinness' baroque-style drawings are filled with color, pattern, and texture. The work implies sexual double-entendres and employs sly turns of phrase.
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 +==Peter HappelChristian and Margaret Wall-Romana==
 +January 21 - April 3, 2011<br>
Minnesota Artists Exhibition Gallery Minnesota Artists Exhibition Gallery
-Each individual has a particular story, made unique by both natural and man-made surroundings. Jennifer Davis, Erika Olson, Terrance Payne, and Joe Sinness create work that focuses on self-images and the impulse to create order where nature would have it otherwise.+The scientific method is a process for documenting events, creating knowledge, and testing theories. Peter Happel Christian measures, collects information, and records data, creating sculptures and photographs that are positioned at the intersection of art, science, and history. He observes the technologies that mediate our everyday relationship with art and natural phenomena, including geography, cartography, and topographical surveys. As part of his MAEP exhibition, "Ground Truth," Happel Christian has invited MIA staff to collaborate with him. He has asked to borrow their office plants, which he will then install in the MAEP galleries and care for during the show.
-Davis's pastel images create a surface veneer of innocence and charm that hints at darker truths beneath the surface.+Margaret Wall-Romana's work engages with the traditions of oil painting. She controls the physics of paint, but also lets go of that control to open up to the paint's own properties. The irresistible tensions on the surfaces of her large-scale paintings keep viewers looking. Wall-Romana structures her paintings using an elaborate atmospheric perspective balanced with non-illusionistic color. A sharp student of art history, she conflates the still-life delicacies of the Dutch Golden Age with Mannerist attitudes towards scale, Hudson River School atmospherics, and yolky Abstract Expressionist smears. Formally, she pushes the physical properties of paint to their limit, with her use of thin, translucent colors to create delicate surfaces, and chalky impasto for ripe forms and textures.
-Olson's drawings and sculptures question people's impulse to clean up and arrange nature and their need to immortalize once-living objects.+==Paula McCartney and Liz Miller==
 +April 22 - July 3, 2011<br>
 +Minnesota Artists Exhibition Gallery
-Payne's oil pastels use narrative element, line and color to capture awkward moments in life's pursuits.+Liz Miller is creating a new site-specific installation for her MAEP exhibition. The work will consist of two- and three-dimensional, wall-mounted and freestanding components cut from industrial felt. Throughout her career, Miller has completely transformed gallery and public spaces with her riotously colored installations. The viewer is immediately pulled into the fastidious complexity of her craft and the beauty of natural and manufactured networks; the work seems to crawl, grow, and swallow up space. As a site-specific artist, Miller has spent many hours researching the MIA and its collection. She is especially interested in the Asian, African, and European collections of weapons and armor, and will find creative means to incorporate these objects into her installation.
-Sinness uses colored pencil and sculpture as a personal examination of queer domesticity, employing fable, history and unconfined possibility as visual metaphor.+"A Field Guide to Snow and Ice" is Paula McCartney's photographic essay of images that recall the northern winter, including falling snow, icicles, and snowdrifts. But McCartney doesn't work in a straightforward documentary style; she combines the grandeur of landscape photographs with delicate figure studies. She uses technical sleights of hand to affect scale; snowdrifts that appear larger than human scale are actually small piles of gypsum sand, and slender icicles are calcite stalactites that grow anonymously, over centuries, in caves. McCartney doesn't look for images; she makes them. Her craft in shooting and printing her photographs is exacting; she is just as precise in her critique of assumptions about the truth-telling, indexical, and documentary aspects of photographic image making.

Current revision

Flourish

Jennifer Davis,Preserve, 2009, acrylic/graphite/charcoal on paper
Enlarge
Jennifer Davis,Preserve, 2009, acrylic/graphite/charcoal on paper

Jennifer Davis, Erika Olson, Terrance Payne, and Joe Sinness
Friday, October 22, 2010—Sunday, January 2, 2011
Minnesota Artists Exhibition Gallery


The Minnesota Artists Exhibition Program presents "Flourish," a group exhibition featuring new work by four Minneapolis artists: Jennifer Davis, Erika Olson Gross, Terrence Payne, and Joe Sinness.

Davis's delicate paintings include a cast of animal, monster, and human characters who all have parts to play in her colorful fantasies. But her charming, Easter-egg palette belies the underlying psychological dramas of introversion and lost innocence.

Olson Gross is a multi-media artist whose sculptures and paintings express the poetry and fecundity of nature. Her most recent bucolic landscapes are intricately painted. The illustrative, woodblock-print flatness of her animal and flora forms resemble collaged scraps of paper attached to the canvas.

Erika Olson Gross Houses, 2010, Watercolor, gouache and graphite on paper
Enlarge
Erika Olson Gross Houses, 2010, Watercolor, gouache and graphite on paper

Payne's large oil pastels on paper produce a sense of humor tinged with melancholy; the hand-written captions reveal his characters' internal narratives of disappointment, apathy, and resignation.

Rendered in colored pencil with a fastidious, hyper-realistic attention to detail, Sinness' baroque-style drawings are filled with color, pattern, and texture. The work implies sexual double-entendres and employs sly turns of phrase.




Peter HappelChristian and Margaret Wall-Romana

January 21 - April 3, 2011
Minnesota Artists Exhibition Gallery

The scientific method is a process for documenting events, creating knowledge, and testing theories. Peter Happel Christian measures, collects information, and records data, creating sculptures and photographs that are positioned at the intersection of art, science, and history. He observes the technologies that mediate our everyday relationship with art and natural phenomena, including geography, cartography, and topographical surveys. As part of his MAEP exhibition, "Ground Truth," Happel Christian has invited MIA staff to collaborate with him. He has asked to borrow their office plants, which he will then install in the MAEP galleries and care for during the show.

Margaret Wall-Romana's work engages with the traditions of oil painting. She controls the physics of paint, but also lets go of that control to open up to the paint's own properties. The irresistible tensions on the surfaces of her large-scale paintings keep viewers looking. Wall-Romana structures her paintings using an elaborate atmospheric perspective balanced with non-illusionistic color. A sharp student of art history, she conflates the still-life delicacies of the Dutch Golden Age with Mannerist attitudes towards scale, Hudson River School atmospherics, and yolky Abstract Expressionist smears. Formally, she pushes the physical properties of paint to their limit, with her use of thin, translucent colors to create delicate surfaces, and chalky impasto for ripe forms and textures.

Paula McCartney and Liz Miller

April 22 - July 3, 2011
Minnesota Artists Exhibition Gallery

Liz Miller is creating a new site-specific installation for her MAEP exhibition. The work will consist of two- and three-dimensional, wall-mounted and freestanding components cut from industrial felt. Throughout her career, Miller has completely transformed gallery and public spaces with her riotously colored installations. The viewer is immediately pulled into the fastidious complexity of her craft and the beauty of natural and manufactured networks; the work seems to crawl, grow, and swallow up space. As a site-specific artist, Miller has spent many hours researching the MIA and its collection. She is especially interested in the Asian, African, and European collections of weapons and armor, and will find creative means to incorporate these objects into her installation.

"A Field Guide to Snow and Ice" is Paula McCartney's photographic essay of images that recall the northern winter, including falling snow, icicles, and snowdrifts. But McCartney doesn't work in a straightforward documentary style; she combines the grandeur of landscape photographs with delicate figure studies. She uses technical sleights of hand to affect scale; snowdrifts that appear larger than human scale are actually small piles of gypsum sand, and slender icicles are calcite stalactites that grow anonymously, over centuries, in caves. McCartney doesn't look for images; she makes them. Her craft in shooting and printing her photographs is exacting; she is just as precise in her critique of assumptions about the truth-telling, indexical, and documentary aspects of photographic image making.